Copycat death threats: Identifying arrested online criminals

South Korean authorities have made a breakthrough in arresting suspects involved in an online copycat death threat, according to the New York Times. This arrest is an important step to ensure public safety and prevent potential violent behavior.

Number of suspects arrested in connection with death threats in South Korea

Following a series of car rampages and two stabbings in South Korea, police have arrested at least seven people suspected of threatening to carry out similar acts. The arrests are part of the authorities’ efforts to restore law and order and instill a sense of security in the population.

Recent violent events in South Korea

Over the past month, South Korea has been rocked by shocking incidents of violence. Fourteen people were injured in Seongnam, southeast of Seoul, in an incident that authorities have characterized as a terrorist act. The assailant drove his car onto a sidewalk near a subway station, injuring five people before stabbing nine others inside the station. On July 21, another stabbing attack in Seoul killed one person and injured three others.

Online threats that spread fear and panic

Police reported that threats of stabbing attacks at several subway stations in Seoul were widely shared on social media platforms, heightening public fear. The threats specified both the time and location of the attack, causing widespread panic.

Five of the suspects were arrested in Seoul, with arrests made in various parts of the city, including Gangnam, Seongdong, Gwanak, and the suburbs. Police were able to track down the suspects through tips from complainants and Internet Protocol address tracing. Some suspects turned themselves in, while others were arrested at the subway station where the attack was expected to take place.

Among those arrested was a 14-year-old boy from Hanam, a suburb of Seoul, who posted on social media that he was going to kill people outside a subway station. The police quickly identified the poster and arrested him the next day while he was wandering around the subway station. The teen claimed that his post was just a joke and that he did not intend to harm anyone.

Authorities issued a stern warning to individuals considering similar threats, emphasizing that posting such content for fun can result in arrest and punishment. He also reassured the public that death threats causing public unrest would be promptly and thoroughly investigated.

  • This post is adapted from https://www.nytimes.com/2023/08/05/world/asia/arrests-copycat-threats-south-korea.html.

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